asylum-art:

October Jones: Hilarious Post-it Notes Left on the Train for Motivation and Cheer

Writer and illustrator October Jones delights with these hilarious motivational post-it notes that he leaves on the train and in other random places. The upbeat doodles, which star the adorable Peppy the Inspirational Cat, convey positive and funny messages meant to encourage daily commuters.

chihariel:

Illustrations for Jane Austen’s classical novels.

By ChihAriel

cross-connect:

The Godlike Mythological and Geometric Paintings of Miriam Escofet

My ‘arrival’ at painting has been a slightly unusual one, in the sense that I purposely set out to study a skills based 3D Design course, where I specialized in ceramics. My rationale for this being that I have always loved the ‘making process’ and I am very interested in the three dimensional and textural quality of objects and spaces. I worked in clay for some years after leaving Art College, whilst starting to get commissions for paintings (mainly watercolours at the time). The painting evolved from this  and eventually took up all my time. Drawing and making are still at the core of the work, but painting allows me to invent other spaces and ideas with no physical constraints.

Thanks to Hi-Fructose Magazine for the find

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Roman Sakovich

Half

The photographer Roman Sakovich has gotten some heat for his project Half, a series of images detailing the effects of drug abuse, particularly with respect to methamphetamine addiction; his subjects stand, face forward, their lefthand side polished, even proud, while on the right, their bodies are ravaged by scars and scabs characteristic of addiction. The jarring split-personas are achieved not through photoshop but with expert make-up and styling.

The artist has been criticized for his simplified portrayal of drug dependency; by his own admission, the images, in their shocking nature, exclude a more nuanced exploration and rely in part stereotypes. Problematic for some is the fact that the non-addict self is styled professionally in suits and crisp button-downs, while the addict wears more urban attire, the implication being that class and drug use are profoundly connected.

Regardless of the controversy (and perhaps even because of it), the shocking series inspires much-needed and critical discussion on drug addiction, an illness that plagues tens of millions nationwide. Avoiding blaming and scapegoating individuals, the artist provides an intimate approximation of selfhood torn by addiction, one that inspires empathy, not disgust or prejudice.

Sakovich’s subjects, their identities split in two, are as you and I, lead by hopes, fears, and complex yearnings. A doctor, stethoscope slung over her shoulder, hair in a tight chignon, directs a placid glance comfortingly at the viewer; only after allowing our eyes to drift across the print do we see this figure of heath and safety cruelly overtaken by substance abuse, her eye downcast and purpled, a dried lip furrowed and lined. We read these bodies from left to right like strange texts, imagining personal and intimate narratives in order to reconcile the two faces before us. Ultimately, we are left with the powerful warning, “This could happen to you.” What do you think?



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