asylum-art:

Postcards for Ants, Artist Creates A Miniature by Lorraine Loots

Artist on Tumblr | FacebookInstagram

Cape Town-based artist Lorraine Loots took up a remarkable 365-day challenge: to create a miniature painting every single day for an entire year. The artist began her challenge in the beginning of 2013 and, after enjoying the routine of her successful challenge, she decided to continue with the “Postcards for Ants” project in 2014.

The young artist has dedicated this year’s works exclusively to Cape Town, which happens to be the official World Design Capital of 2014. Fans of Loots’s work can write to the artist and book up-coming paintings or prints, or suggest Cape Town-themed ideas or places for her to paint.

arsvitaest:

Francisco Toledo, Comiendo chapulines (Eating Grasshoppers), 1977Ink, wash and watercolor on Arches paper

arsvitaest:

Francisco Toledo, Comiendo chapulines (Eating Grasshoppers), 1977
Ink, wash and watercolor on Arches paper

myampgoesto11:

A Ring Box Opening Like A Flower

Canadian designer Andrew Zo has created a ring box, called Clifton, which has the discrete shape of a wallet. This little box presents the ring in a very aesthetic way since the ring turns and blooms like a flower in front of your lover’s eyes. This box’s cost is set at $90 and it will be once more available to buy on October.

found at Fubiz

My Amp Goes To 11Twitter | Instagram

asylum-art:

Christine Anderson: Fenced Dragon Lost and Found

"Fenced Dragon Lost and Found" about death, grief. All materials used in the images come from a place where I found the carcasses of deer. The house and property seized deteriorated much faster than the deer was dead. I wanted to give the deer a bit of my creativity. So maybe we could all be heard two.

"I am not afraid of death, but the process of dying itself.

My brother had asked me if I wanted to go see foreclosed property where two deer died in an attempt to jump a fence.  I was interested in how the deer that could easily jump a six-foot fence could get impaled on a five-foot fence, so I asked my brother to drive me to the site.

I found that the carcasses of the deer were rotting on the fence like my brother had told me.  The two deer were in various states of decay on different parts of the property.  It was the first week of spring after a brutally cold and snowy winter. When the earth was buried in snow the deer tried to jump the fence and sank into the snow as they made their leap.  They had no hard ground to make the jump off of and ended up getting caught on the fence that was spiked at the top.  They died a slow painful death.

No one heard their cries; no one saw their struggle as they died. Predators had left their marks, including me. Am I a predator taking pictures making my marks or am I telling their story? I did not hear their cries or see their struggle.  I only saw the evidence of their slow struggle to die. And now I will also observe their decay.

I can tell their story, but will someone hear or see me?

Am I the deer? Taking my pictures that may or may not be seen.  Like the deer no one sees my struggles.  Or am I a predator taking the last thing the deer have left to give – their story.”